Atlantis – The Myth

Atlantis: the mysterious mythical land.
Atlantis cannot have existed, good man!
A city of circular islands can’t be.
What? Do you think I’m a fool? I can’t see?
Plato meant naught but to prove his own thoughts.
Don’t let yourself in his story be caught!

First, after all, it’s a myth of Greek gods!
Second, could it be so adorned? The odds?
To continue, the idea of orichalcum is wrong.
A metal so rare we’ve found none for so long?
And it glows! Oh it glows a bright shade of red!
Only three reasons this belief should be shed!

I’ll give a few more, if you’ll hear me out,
Though his philosophy’s great, Plato’s history I doubt!
Of Atlantis, no great historian had heard.
With a city so intense, I think that’s absurd!
And the fact that it existed so long ago?
Our science disagrees that’s it’s possible, you know.

But there’s more! Oh much more, science on my side.
Where, do you think, these ruins could hide?
A disaster so great to hide Atlantis so huge?
Could this be achieved by the greatest deluge?
We’ve been looking and looking for hundreds of years!
So give up! It’s absurd! Listen to your peers!

Ever since Plato first wrote of Atlantis, people have doubted the validity of his tale. The leading reason to doubt the truth of Atlantis is that Plato was a philosopher, not a historian, and so we can only assume that he was using a fictional story to prove a point. (The Atlantis Secret) Other reasons to doubt Plato include the source of his information and the time frame he gives. No evidence has been found that Atlantis was recorded by the Egyptians as he states, and he places the Atlantis c. 9600 BCE but science has dated the first civilizations much later, in 4000 BCE. For these and other reasons, many people consider Atlantis a myth.

BACK TO: About The Four Descriptions of Atlantis
NEXT: Atlantis – The Fact

One thought on “Atlantis – The Myth

  1. Pingback: Four Descriptions of Atlantis | Strangers in a Strange Land

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